3 Tips On Getting Phenomenal Survival Bartering Power

Have you ever thought about the items you’ll use in a survival barter situation? I’ve always thought that it required stacks of dollar bills packed away in my bug out bag. But something changed my mind.

Today I took my car into the local car repair shop. Paying $300 wasn’t my favorite thing to do, but the car works now. Don’t get me wrong, I appreciate Wayne a lot. If he wasn’t nearby, then the job would surely be more expensive. But the entire experience made me think.

A disaster scenario came to mind. So, what do you think would happen if disaster struck and Wayne had to evacuate? For a minute, I thought that Wayne would be in big trouble having to leave his shop. Tools, lifts, oil, tires, everything. He would leave behind all of the stuff he’d invested in just to save himself and his family. We’d be so happy that we weren’t the ones leaving the shop behind. But there’s some irony to this situation. He’s not in as bad a shape as you think. You see, his skills are evergreen.

#1 Evergreen Skills

Evergreen skills are skills useable anywhere and anytime. They don’t go out of style. They are commonly needed. And they will always be needed. In essence, they are ‘ever’ + ‘green’. So how does this relate to Wayne? He’s a car mechanic. Everyone owns a car. So if he leaves his shop and everything behind, he can still setup shop somewhere else. How does this relate to you? You want evergreen skills. These put you in a good position for survival bartering. But that’s just one way to improve your bargaining power.

#2 Skills Are Tradeable

In disasters you trade. But with what? You could trade old furniture. You could buy bread with those old toys your kids don’t need anymore? But there’s a problem with that idea. How are you going to carry boxes of toys around as currency? That makes no sense. What does make sense is to trade with skills. So instead of carrying around boxes of stuff, you carry around your skill set. Which leaves a lot of room in your bug out bag to pack other stuff. So let’s cover the third thing that will give you bargaining power in survival bartering.

#3 Skills Don’t Diminish With Use

This is the big one. Let me give you an example. If you have 1 radio, and you trade it for 1 pounds of food. You now have your food. But you have no more radio. You are out. The food you will eat, and so you’ve eaten the value you bought. You’ve eaten your currency in essence. On the other hand, when you trade with a survival bartering skill, you still have that skill. After you’ve traded, you still have the same skills that you had before the trade.

So with my friend Wayne, if he needs food, he can fix a tire, and get 3 loaves of bread for his time. And still has just as much skill in his back pocket as he did when he started. Unfortunately, most people don’t think like that. They are concerned more about things than skills.

Summary

So to summarize, to be in the best position for bartering, you’ll want the best system. And to have the best system in the world for bartering, you’ll want to have the best skills. And to have the best skills, you want skills that are evergreen, tradeable and that don’t diminish with use.

So let’s do this. Lets come up with a way to get you onto the right road to barter in a disaster. Why don’t you do this. Make a list of your skills that could serve as your survival barter items. Try to come up with 10 skills that you have. Next to each one, put a rating on its value. Try scoring it from 1 to 10. So let’s say 1 is low and 10 will be the highest and most valuable.

Ask yourself what others might need, and if you could see that event happening in a disaster. If you do, then that might be a 10. Do you know radio communications? How about car fixing? Are you a computer guru? Are you a good cook? What’s your fire making ability like? Can you throw up a shelter real fast? Come up with your own Survival Barter List and see how much bartering power you really do have.

Fire Starting Methods – Five Tips For Starting a Survival Fire

There are a lot of different ways to start a fire if you find yourself in a situation where you need one. What I’m talking about here is survival fires. You find yourself in a survival situation and you need a fire to keep yourself warm, dry out your clothes, or cook something tasty to eat.

Let me first say this. You know if you are not old enough to do this without adult supervision. So just don’t do it without adult supervision if you aren’t old enough to do it by yourself. You could get yourself into a lot of trouble and either hurt yourself or others or destroy a lot of property. Fire is a great tool if used properly but can be dangerous and destructive if you do not respect it.

The time to learn how to start a fire is not when you are in a survival situation. You need to practice this skill to get good at it.

Tip#1 for starting a survival fire – No matter what type of fire-starting method you use, you will need tinder and small twigs to begin with, so go ahead and gather it now. Tinder is any light weight combustible material that will easily light. Straws, dry grasses, and stringy type tree bark work well. Sometimes I take lint from my dryer and place it in a small Ziploc bag, then put it in my pants pocket when I plan to go to the woods. Dryer lint makes a great fire starter.

You should use wood that is finger sized in diameter for your starting wood. Be sure to go ahead and gather a few slightly larger pieces of wood also. After going through a lot of effort to start your fire, you don’t want to let it go out because you weren’t prepared.

Clear leaves and other debris from around your fire area to prevent the accidental spread of your fire into an area where you don’t want it. If this is a practice survival fire or a campfire, be sure to have plenty of water available to be used to put out the fire. This way if your fire begins to get out of hand, you can quickly put it out. Do not attempt to start a fire when the woods are extremely dry or on a windy day.

Tip#2 Always carry a good disposable cigarette lighter with you when you go to the woods. There is no need to try and be a hero. I usually have two or more cigarette lighters in my pocket when I go into the woods. They are light weight, don’t take up much room, and usually work great.

Tip#3 If you have a flashlight with you, use the batteries to start a fire. It will help if you have 00 steel wool. You can buy it at the hardware store. Steel wool is made of thousands of tiny metal fibers. These fibers are so small, that the electricity from a flashlight battery will quickly cause them to glow orange. Add some steel wool to your survival kit or pocket as a back-up. Practice this method in case for some reason your lighters don’t work.

Tip#4 You can purchase flint and steel from a number of sources. Practice striking the flint and steel together to send a spark into your tinder. This will take some practice. You never know when you may be in a situation where you have access to a piece of steel in a survival situation. You may be able to strike your steel against rock. Practicing will prepare you for this situation. I do not recommend using your knife for this purpose. Your knife is too valuable to you in a survival situation, and usually doesn’t make that good of a fire starter anyhow. Don’t damage your knife. If you absolutely have to try it, be sure to use the back of the knife blade and not the edge.

Tip#5 Try using a friction method. This is usually the first thing that comes to the mind of most people when they think of a survival fire. There are several friction methods. One of the most popular seems to be the fire bow. Basically for this method, you will use a shoe lace or other similar cordage to manufacture a tiny bow. You will also need a piece of wood for the drill and a fire board. I prefer to use scrub willow for my fire bow construction. This method looks easy, but it takes a lot of practice to get it right. It helps tremendously if you know someone who can teach you this method.

You will need to carve a notch in the edge of your fireboard. When you drill, material from your fireboard and drill will build up in the notch and form a coal. You will then need to transfer that hot coal to your tinder. A good way to do this is to have your tinder underneath the notch on your fireboard to begin with. You will carefully wrap the tinder around your hot coal and gently blow on it. This adds a lot of oxygen for fuel. As you continue to blow on your tinder, it will begin to smoke. Once it lights, you will want to place your tinder underneath some of your small twigs which should be set up in a small tee pee type formation. Of course, your twigs will now begin to catch on fire. As you manage your small fire, you will gradually add more and larger pieces of wood.

There are a multitude of methods you can use for starting a survival fire. Pick one and begin to study and practice it until you have mastered it. Then try another. You cannot be too prepared, and your friends will be impressed with your new skills and knowledge.

5 Tips To Urban Warfare Survival

According to the urban survival manual, a war that is carried out in highly populated areas such as towns, cities and metro cities is known as “urban warfare”. This kind of warfare is very different to the conventional warfare in features such as planning and functioning. The unique features of urban warfare are the intricacy of the landscape and the involvement of civilians or the urban dwellers.

These urban dwellers take up the form of military residents who are armed and mostly go about in small groups so as to scare away the attackers and protect their homes. This tactic adopted by the civilians may make them look similar to the attackers which could land them into trouble.

In times of urban warfare, all kinds of arms and weapons are used without taking into consideration their disastrous outcomes. The urban setting can cause moderation in the use of combat techniques. For instance, it is highly illegal for the government’s army to attack a residential area with a hefty number of soldiers.

The five tips to urban warfare survival as mentioned in the urban survival manual are as follows:

First of all, the technique of observation is the best tip to urban warfare survival. A person who is facing these life and death situations needs to be alert about his surroundings and his company. As observed throughout the years, most people are usually unaffected with what happens in their surroundings. This attitude can save one from a lot of trouble.

Second, face value holds much importance in these times. The urban survival manual highlights this tip as the most beneficial one. To show people that you have money one needs to carry a certain look, this exhibits inner confidence. It normally takes career oriented people years and years of practice and skill to master this look which will, in the end, save one from attackers.

Third, you should constantly be up to date about any developments in your immediate surroundings. This is a useful tip that can help you and your companions in warfare survival. One should be up to date with the present economic, political, and social scenario of your locale to avoid troubles or problems.

Fourth, the urban survival manual states that speaking your mind could be one of the biggest mistakes you can commit in times of urban warfare. Being overtly friendly or prudent can have serious consequences that could have serious consequences.

Finally, being prepared at all times is the key to survival during urban warfare. This gives you an edge over the not so concerned civilians. In this manner, you can save yourself and your family s well as possessions from being exploited.

Review of Common Urban Survival Tips

Urban survival means to be able to survive when disaster strikes. It could be an earthquake, tornado, economy collapse or social unrest. A large number of natural disasters can kill hundreds and thousands of people. They can displace thousands of families and destroy billion worth of properties. And so are manmade calamities.

To survive, one must be aware of his surroundings. This is how he can prepare for any unforeseen events. You can prepare for such situations by observing the geography of your area. Are you in close proximity with the coastline? In the past, was there any occurrence of mudslide? What is the history of your locality?

Another important tip is to store large quantities of water. Store up water that will enable you to survive for at least four weeks. You might not be able to go out and buy provisions when a calamity occurs. If it rains, fill all empty containers with rainwater. You can later purify it with purifying tablets or water filter.

Stockpiling your survivalist apartment with enough food is also a sound advice. Powdered, pickled, dehydrated, cured, canned and instant no-cook food products are best for this purpose. They have a longer shelf life and are easy to stash. Rice and pastas are excellent staple foods. They are a great source of carbohydrates that provide an energy boost. Unfortunately, they need to be cooked first before they can be eaten.

Another thing to consider is having enough clothing, preferably the layered ones. That is because the first layer will provide ventilation and prevent excessive sweating. The second layer offers insulation and helps you to keep warm in cold weather. The third layer should be waterproofed. GORE-TEX is considered the best fabric for clothes like this.

In times like this, you should also have a first-aid kit ready with you. The kit should have all the basic medicines, bandages, antiseptics, cotton balls, thermometers and first-aid guide.

Additionally, you must be equipped with fire building tools such as waterproof matchbox. A durable sharp knife, some sturdy rope and waterproof garment should also be included in your list. They can come in handy when building a temporary shelter, hunting for food, or looking for escape. A knife can also be used to defend yourself against unexpected assailants.

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Survival Tips – How To Build The Best Bug Out Bag

Life can throw a lot of different situations at you in a hurry, situations you might never see coming. With the world in the state it’s in, it can be easy to get scared and start feeling like you need to be prepared for “the worst.” The secret to having some peace of mind is being prepared ahead of time for the unpredictable. Because the very worst that can happen is a disaster in which you are unable to care for yourself or the ones you love. That’s where having a bug out bag comes in handy.

The best bug out bag is ready when you need it and contains everything required for living away from civilization for at least 7-days. A bug out bag assumes that there may come a time when, for whatever reason, you have to leave your home and not return for at least a few days. It also assumes that, should things be so bad that you have to leave your home, you won’t be able to drive down to the local Wal-Mart and stock up on everything you’ll be needing. So it’s important to spend some time ahead of the disaster, assessing your current situation and needs, as well as anticipating your needs down the road.

What Is A Bug Out Bag?

Several types of emergency preparedness kits are commonly referred to as a Bug Out Bag or BOB. Each serves a different, though sometimes similar, purpose in being prepared for whatever might come your way. An everyday carry kit contains emergency items that you keep on your person at all times. These are items that will help you survive emergency situations and daily challenges more easily. A get home bag is designed to do just what the name implies, to get you home. It contains more gear than you would carry on your person every day, and you would typically keep it at your office or in your car. A bug out bag is an emergency kit that provides everything you need to survive for up to a week without any outside contact or resources.

It may help to think of the three types of bags this way: In the event of a disaster, your everyday carry gear gets you from where you are to your get home bag. Your get home bag gets you to your bug out bag. And your bug out bag is designed to keep you safe for an extended period of time.

Identifying Your Needs

Different factors mean different needs. Things to consider when mapping out your bug out bag should include:

Where do you live? Living in a rural or urban environment will influence your needs during a survival situation. If you’re likely to face survival in a disaster-stricken inner city environment, you may require self-defense and demolition tools more than shelter and fire starting materials. However, most people will likely attempt to make it to a wilderness area to wait out whatever situation they’re getting away from.

Where would you go if your home were no longer safe? Planning ahead gives you the opportunity to get a feel for the land and map out various strengths and weaknesses. If you require a map for your chosen area, you’ll want to include one as you pack your bug out bag.

How will you get there? Depending on the type of disaster, there’s the possibility that you’d be on foot. You may need two destinations, one you can reach by car and another by foot. If you were able to “bug out” in your vehicle, all the better, but you want to pack your bug out bag with the thought that you’ll be carrying it a long way. Keeping that in mind will help you to make realistic weight limit decisions. You could always keep an extra bag of “nice to have” items close by to throw in the back of the truck or car if you can drive.

Who depends on you? Few people live in a vacuum. If disaster struck, who would look to you for help? Do you have children in the home? A spouse or partner you need to consider? Keep these people in mind when planning your bug out bag. Involve them in planning and have them, or help them, pack a bug out bag for themselves, as well.

Unique medical needs? Do you, or those you care for, have any unique medical needs that should be considered? Rescue medications like inhalers and Epi-pens should always have a priority place in any emergency preparedness.

Once you’ve identified your needs, along with the people who will need you, make a plan with your family or extended group. Choose an area where you’ll gather should the need arise. Each person should have prepared their own bug out bag and be able to get there independently. For parents with children, consider their age and capability when creating a family disaster plan.

What Should Go In The Best Bug Out Bag?

Water the human body can only last up to 72 hours without water. You should plan for at least a liter of water, per day, per person. Carrying all that water may not be practical, but you should have at least some packaged water in your bag, as well as ways to sanitize water for future use. Water sanitation tablets or a simple filtration system can be the easiest and lightest to pack.

Food You’ll want food you can eat now, and ways to get food in the future. Protein bars, MREs or other dehydrated meals, jerky are great. Canned goods may be considered, but they add weight and bulk. There are many pre-packaged emergency foods available commercially. When choosing food, remember to take into account any food allergies or severe sensitivities. One of the last things you want to deal with in the bush is a severe allergic reaction.

Food PreparationDon’t forget that you’ll have to prepare your food. Be sure to include things like:

  • Can opener
  • Metal pot or something else to cook in
  • Portable stove
  • Stove fuel
  • Eating utensils and dishes
  • Pot scrubber to clean up after

Clothing This is a variable component, depending on your personality, region, time of year, etc. Layering is the name of the game. Some suggestions:

  • Lightweight long sleeve shirt
  • At least one pair of long pants – you might consider “zip off” convertible pants
  • Hiking boots (on your feet) and an extra pair of shoes, if possible.
  • Underwear – a change or two, it’s up to you
  • Good socks – several pairs of moisture-wicking socks
  • Fleece jacket – medium weight jacket for layering
  • Hat with brim
  • Gloves – winter or work gloves
  • Poncho
  • Neck protection – A scarf or gator, for sun or cold

Shelter and Bed

  • Tarp – must have
  • Tent – optional
  • Sleeping Bag – must have
  • Ground pad – optional
  • Extra blanket – optional

Fire You really can never have too many methods for starting a fire. Choose at least three to pack in your bug out bag:

  • Lighter – get a good one, Zippo type wind-proof is best
  • Flint and Steel
  • Waterproof matches
  • Magnesium rod and striker
  • Fire piston
  • Batteries and steel wool
  • Lens

Tinder You’ll want to pack several types of tinder, just in case:

  • Cotton balls coated with Vaseline (keep them in a baggie, or they’ll make a mess)
  • Paper
  • Pine chips
  • Cedar shavings
  • Dryer lint
  • Commercial fire starters, there are many

First Aid There are several very good first aid kits available commercially. If you want to put together your own, you’ll need at least:

  • Alcohol pads
  • Band aids
  • Bandages with tape
  • Antibiotic ointment
  • Vaseline
  • Sunscreen – an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure, and all that
  • Insect repellent
  • Super glue for closing wounds
  • Medical needs – Inhalers, Epi-pens, blood pressure medications, etc.

Hygiene

  • Wet napkins
  • Hand sanitizer
  • All purpose camp soap (dish soap or bar soap, whichever you prefer, or both)
  • Mirror (hygiene and signaling)
  • Small towel and a cloth
  • Toilet paper (you’ll thank us later)
  • Toothbrush and toothpaste
  • Personal hygiene needs – deodorant, feminine hygiene products, a brush or comb, ponytail holders if you have long hair, etc.

Tools It’s easy to get carried away when it comes to tools. Because it’s important to keep the overall weight and bulk down, you’ll want to choose combination tools whenever possible:

  • Survival knife – you may already have one as a part of your everyday carry gear, but make sure you have a backup.
  • Multi-tool – there are many on the market, get one that gives you the most bang for your buck.
  • Hatchet or machete – you won’t want to do everything with your knife, so taking something heavier makes sense.

Lighting Always have at least primary and one backup light source:

  • Flashlight
  • LED lamp
  • Headlamp
  • Glow sticks
  • Candles
  • Extra batteries

Communication Consider that your cell phone may not work in an emergency. You might want to have a short wave radio, or some other means of communication with you, as well.

Cash Travel funds. It’s a good idea to have some cash, and perhaps some gold or silver bullion coins, as well.

Local Map Even if you’re familiar with the area take a map. Not having one could be disastrous.

Compass you may already have a compass combined with your analog watch. If you do not, include

one in your bug out bag.

Notepad and Pencil This is a good place to keep important numbers and addresses. Without a cell phone, many of us wouldn’t remember a phone number to call if we got the chance.

Self-defenseThe need for a bug out bag implies that you are trying to survive. Take with you the best means of self-defense that you have. Include non-lethal means, in addition to whatever weapon you might choose to carry: whistle, pepper spray, etc. If you carry a gun, take extra ammunition, 25 rounds minimum.

Misc. items – Make choices based on your abilities, lack of ability, carrying capacity, space, etc.:

  • Paracord – Must have – 50′ is a good start
  • Bandannas – several cotton bandannas will come in handy for a variety of uses.
  • Duct tape
  • Garbage bags – 55 gal contractor bags are best
  • Resealable bags – four or five, gallon and quart size
  • Sunglasses
  • Sewing kit
  • Fishing Kit
  • Binoculars
  • Face paint (optional)
  • Snare Wire

How To Choose

The fact is, unless your bug out bag is a camper hooked to a truck, you just can’t take everything. That would be camping and not bugging out at all. So at some point you’ll have to make choices based on space and weight limitations. You’ll need to consider the distance you’ll be traveling, as weight can really add up over miles. Being able to get a pack on your back and walk across the yard is no test of your ability to get from point A to point B with it. Remember, the best bug out bag is the one you have when you need it. Having more than you can safely carry, could force you to make decisions about what to leave behind, while already under stress. That won’t set you up for success.

The weight recommendations for men is up to 20% of their body weight. This is an outside max, and assumes peak physical condition. Ten to 15% is a much more realistic weight goal. Weight recommendations for women is 10% to 15% max.

Everything has weight and takes up space. Refer back to your planning phase; remember to choose those items that you are most likely to need first, and add to it as space and weight allow.

Choosing A Good Pack

Keep a couple of things in mind: a compact bag, packed full, with no extra space, is going to be the easiest to carry. A larger, loosely packed bag, even with equal weight, is more uncomfortable. So choose the smallest bag that will still accommodate the volume and weight that you’re targeting. Remember, too, that the bag itself weighs something. Choosing a light but durable bag will be vital to having the best bug out bag possible.

Assembling Your Bug Out Bag

Packing things flat, or rolled very tightly, will allow you to fit more in less space. Make a list of items along with their weight. Start packing the most important, keeping track of the overall weight as it grows.

Don’t overestimate your ability to carry your pack for hours at a time. This is a costly mistake that may land you without the survival gear you need. Once you’ve carried a too heavy pack as far as you’re able, you’ll have to lighten it beyond the recommended weight in order to finish your trek. That’s lose lose. Proper packing, keeping your weight limit in mind at all times, is a vital part of preparing the best bug out bag possible.

Be Prepared, Not Scared

Once you’ve packed your bug out bag, take it out for a weekend of camping and survival training. Practicing your survival skills in a non-stress environment insures that you’re ready, physically and mentally, when the challenge arises. Skills that are only in your head, may not serve you well in the field. After a weekend of surviving with your bug out bag, unpack, re-evaluate and repack. Did you find that you needed things you didn’t have? Did you have things you didn’t need, or that would have been better traded out for a different item? Preparing for the future, and whatever eventualities it may hold, allows you the peace of mind to relax and enjoy the here and now. If you’re prepared, you don’t need to be scared.