Fanny Pack Survival Kit: What Examples, Features And Contents You Should Include

When it comes to survival kits, you’d think that more is better, right? But that’s not always the case. Let me explain. Lets take the Bug Out Bag for instance. It’s big enough to carry tools, shelter, food and fire making gear. But can you carry the entire thing everywhere? Can you carry it into your office every day?

You might be able to last longer with a larger backpack. But you won’t be as mobile. Also, the larger pack will be limiting. So is it all that practical?

And that’s where the Fanny Pack comes in. The biggest reason for a fanny pack is mobility. And when you bring in the right mix of gear, you’ll be able to travel far with minimal weight.

So what I’m going to do is give you four tips for choosing and filling your Fanny Pack with the right features and gear. Afterwards, you’ll have the simple framework for your own Every Day Carry or EDC in the format of a Fanny Pack. So lets get started!

FIRST FANNY PACK TIP – Compartmentalization

Fanny packs make sense. That’s because you are packing all your stuff into a small footprint. Also, it’s compartmentalized and gives you easy access around your waist. Two examples of packs that fit this model are the Maxpedition and the Sabercat. Both have this compartmentalization feature. And with compartments, you have the ability to specialize. Specialization gear might include any of these items:

  • water purification/hydration gear
  • fire making
  • communications gear
  • illumination gear

Speaking of compartments, internal cargo pockets would be nice to have. Other types of compartments to look out for are:

  • external shove it pocket
  • exterior side pocket
  • gusseted zippered pockets
  • fleece lined non scratching sunglass eyewear pocket.

So far we’ve talked about smaller items. But don’t think you can’t have a shelter compartment. With ultra lightweight space blankets and tube tents, you can have a shelter compartment in your fanny pack. It’s complete, organized, lightweight and gives you the essentials. So let’s get a little deeper into what those essentials are.

SECOND FANNY PACK TIP – Features to look for

While compartments are important, construction is key. Your fanny pack has to accept the abuse that it’s going to get. It cannot break down in the middle of bugging out. Otherwise your hands will be full carrying all the contents. So the whole point of a 1 person emergency kit (even if its a large fanny pack) around your hip is to make your life hands free.

So lets look at some features of good strong fanny pack emergency survival kit bags.

  • An adjustable waistband is essential. Once you’ve been walking for a few hours, belt adjustment will be necessary.
  • Built-in hip pads wouldn’t hurt. That’s in case your pack gets heavy. (Paladin has the Mission Pack Belt specifically made for this kind of use. )
  • Another feature to check out is the shoulder strap. The S.O.TECH Go Bag’s shoulder strap is tactically worn over one shoulder or around the waist. This gives the operator on-the-go access by rotating the bag from back to front and quickly accessing the contents of the bag.
  • Features on the pack to look out for are large YKK® zipper pull cords for quick opening and fabric made out of 1000 or more Denier nylon.
  • If you can get some PUx2 water repellant coating on the main body and inside pocket flaps, that’s even better.

Finally, think about ID tags and reflective tape to give you high visibility markings. IR or GLINT tape are perfect for infra-red nighttime visibility. This will let EMS and emergency responders find you. Now that we have the basics of the pack its self, lets’ look at some essentials to include inside of your fanny pack.

THIRD FANNY PACK TIP – Essentials to include

Often, people ask “how to build the perfect bug out bag” or “what to put in your bug out bag”. Great question. That’s because without the right stuff, you’ll be stuck focusing on the wrong stuff at the wrong time. So what’s the “right” stuff to focus on when it comes to a fanny pack survival kit? The right stuff should be light, multi purpose, and great at doing its job. So lets talk about some items that fit that bill right now.

  • Fanny Pack Water/Food/Hydration/FoodPrep: With water you have two options. Bring your own, or clean whatever you run into. With the “bring your own” option, water packets are the best choice. The downside is that you won’t have much water. That’s because there’s not much in each packet. One way around this would be water tablets to purify any water you do find. They are perfect because they are compact and lightweight. Another hydration option is to bring a SteriPen UV water filter. The SteriPen has a small footprint, and gets the dangerous stuff out of your water. But you’ll need a silk cloth or something to filter out rocks, dirt and sand. The SteriPen will do the rest. It eliminates over 99% of bacteria, viruses and protozoa that cause water born illnesses. Another plus is that it can do 16 ounces of water in under 50 seconds. They even have a windup model
  • Shelter/Bedding: Space and weight are the keys here. Remember, this all has to fit this into your fanny pack, and leave room for other stuff. So what’s the solution? Tyvek. Tyvek makes a great shelter because it is so lightweight, waterproof and durable all at the same time.
  • Along with the Tyvek, you’ll need some line to tie the corners down or attach to a tree. So a paracord bracelet will provide you with all the line you’ll need. One tip, if you can put grommets in the corners of your Tyvek tarp, it’ll make attaching it to things easier.
  • Another item to add to the Shelter/Bedding compartment would be a Medical grade self warming blanket. The Heat Treat® self-warming, disposable, medical grade blanket is your ticket. It has been developed out of efforts between medical acute care people and is the world leader in self warming products The Heat Treat® is a self contained warming blanket that gives you critical heat up to 104F once its exposed to air. It keeps it there for up to 12 hours. This blanket has proven itsself with hospitals and medical offices.
  • Fanny Pack First Aid: Bandaids are pretty simple to understand, right? But what happens when someone in your group gets a wound that’s more than you can handle? QuikClot® Combat Gauze™ is the answer. QuikClot has helped first responders, safety teams and the military to save many lives. It has stopping power like nothing else. QuikClot is also easy to use. No mixing or measuring. It does have some downsides. But in an emergency, it can save lives.
  • For Hygiene here are some great ideas that are compact, and lend themselves well to a fanny pack. mini towel tablets, canned clothes, paper shampoo, pocket shower
  • Fanny Pack Illumination/Lighting: Its one thing to bring a flashlight. But what happens when your batteries run out? What if you could recharge them… with your body?. Or with something as common as water or urine? There is a battery called the AquaCell that runs off of water. Forget about solar or recharging things. AquaCells come in double or triple A sizes.
  • Fanny Pack Communications: I think that the best you can do in communications would be a HAM radio. And the Yaesu VX8R is the winner. It is handheld and easily fits into your pack. Also, its submersible. So water won’t be a problem with this baby.
  • But lets say that you don’t have a HAM license. And you dont have a radio. What then? The SAR eclipse signal device will be something to check out. It’s a mirror with features to allow you to fine tune where you are shining the mirror. You can signal people 10, 20, 50 miles away on a sunny day. Airplane pilots have been known to see signal mirror signals from 100 miles away
  • Fanny Pack Fire/Tools: You cant have a survival kit without firemaking ability. Two items that I’ll never go without are the BlastMatch and WetFire blocks. The BlastMatch is a one handed firesteel device made for all weather use. It will light in the wind, rain or snow. It puts out a stream of high heat sparks. And when you combine it with WetFire Tinder, you can start a fire in the middle of a hard rain. Another addition to bring is Camping Matches. These are unique because they stay lit under water. That’s right.

Alright so we’ve got our list of essential items to bring in the Fanny Pack. So what’s next?

FOURTH FANNY PACK TIP – Examples to check out

Again, no one pack has every feature I just covered. But here are the top ones that I’m choosing.

  • Rothco nylon butt pack is simple and durable with water repellant fabric and cinch straps.
  • Fannypack survival kit
  • Remora Gearslinger isn’t really a fanny pack. It’s a sling pack. But its loaded with almost all the features I listed above.
  • Sabercat Versipack is big, but believe it or not, it can be worn as a fanny pack. It has plenty of compartments, molle straps, zippers, etc
  • Proteus Versipack is a slightly smaller version of the Sabercat Versipack with much the same construction.

When I think of a survival kit, I usually think of something I have to hand carry around. But when I looked into these fanny pack designs, it became clear to me that keeping my hands free when I’m bugging out is a big deal. A backpack might be too much in some cases.

One idea would be to carry a fanny pack and a backpack. So you can quick release the backpack and move with the fanny pack for excursions. But still, these things are pretty impressive. Especially the Remora Gearslinger.

This week, go visit WalMart or KMart, and see what they have. Buy some cheap waist pack just to experiment with. Try incorporating some of the gear in this article.

Once you have your fanny pack, then start putting items and supplies into your kit. A great start would be the BlastMatch. And when you check it out, give me a shout!

Tyvek Tent: 4 Reasons Why House Wrap Belongs In Your Survival Kit

Imagine bugging out in the middle of a natural disaster. And imagine a perfectly waterproof shelter on your back that weighs almost nothing. That’s what a Tyvek tent would feel like.

Sure there are plenty of alternatives to a home depot tent like plastic, Mylar space blankets, canvas and Gore-Tex. But these are either very expensive comparatively speaking, or non breathable.

So here are the key reasons why Tyvek, house wrap or Typar make sense as an emergency shelter material.

1) cheap

2) lightweight

3) waterproof and

4) machine washable.

REASON #1: TYVEK SHELTERS ARE CHEAP

Cheap is important because survival isn’t about glamor. The less money you have to spend on shelter per square foot, means you can buy more of it. Let me show you what I mean.

I have a Coleman Weathermaster tent. It’s 9’x17’x6′ high. So I’m getting 618 square feet for about $175.

In contrast, a 9’x150′ roll of Tyvek is about $150. You’re getting about 1350 square feet. That’s twice the square footage for what you get with the Weathermaster.

Look, you wont be hauling around a 150′ roll of anything in a survival situation. But I hope you can see the value difference.

Here’s a second reason why Tyvek is a better choice.

REASON #2: TYVEK IS LIGHT

Let’s take the WeatherMaster again. It weighs between 25-30 pounds. On the other hand, the same amount of Tyvek weighs under 5 pounds.

That’s 1/5 the weight of the 6 man tent, just by using a different material. That will take quite a load off of your back. OK, we’ve covered price and weight. What’s next? Protection against the elements.

REASON #3: WATERPROOF

If you’re wondering if Tyvek is waterproof or water resistant then check this out. Tyvek is not only a great home protector, but can be a great shelter, tarp, ground cloth and bivvy sack material. Let me share a real quick little lesson on waterproofness.

There’s a measurement for “waterproofness”. Its called Hydrostatic Head or HH. Waterproof fabrics all have a minimum HH rating of 1000. The rating stands for a column of water that’s 1000 number of millimeters high. So HH of 1000 means a column of 1000 mm high can stand on the fabric before the fabric starts letting water through.

Again, 1000 HH is the lowest waterproof rating level. Most tent material is about HH 1200. Tyvek is about HH 2100. Its waterproof. And it’s a great moisture barrier. But what do you do when Tyvek gets dirty and muddy?

REASON #4: WASHABLE

Here’s something interesting. Most house wrap is biodegradable and disposable. And some types of Tyvek are even washable. You just throw them into a washing machine. Put the machine on delicate, throw in some liquid Tide and hot water and you’re good to go. Just like clothing. At first it crinkles, and after a while it softens up.

So there you have it. Four great reasons why Tyvek makes sense as a tent, tarp and shelter material. At first I thought it was a joke when I heard about it. But the more I read, the more it made sense. Tyvek is indeed cheap, light, waterproof and its washable.

This week, go out and find yourself a 10×10′ sheet. Pick up some Tyvek tape off of Amazon.

Then throw a quick bivvy sack together. Insert your sleeping bag. Go camping out in your back yard this weekend and tell me if it doesn’t work great. And while you’re at it, try coming up with your own Tyvek tent ideas and let me know what you discovered.

An Emergency Kit Can Save Your Life

Natural Disasters

If an emergency kit can save just one life, it would be worth owning. Natural disasters have caused more than 20,000 deaths in the United States. Must-haves such as survival food, emergency water, shelter, sleeping bag and first aid supplies will give you a better chance of surviving disasters like a hurricane, fire, blizzard and an earthquake. The following article will attempt to outline the many different uses an emergency kit may provide you and your family during natural disasters caused by severe weather, extreme heat, and snowstorms.

Severe Weather

A disaster kit could have saved one of the 6,000 people that died from severe weather in the United States. Thunderstorms, tornados, hurricanes, and floods have been responsible for killing more people than all other natural disasters. That said, owning a kit would significantly mitigate many of the indirect deaths caused by severe weather. This type of survival bag gives you 24/7 access to must-haves such as:

  • emergency food,
  • emergency water,
  • survival blanket,
  • first aid supplies,
  • emergency tow rope,
  • reflective triangle kit,
  • duct tape,
  • emergency car shovel; and
  • jumper cables.

These items would give you a better chance at repairing a puncture, recovering from a vehicle breakdown, jump starting your car battery and building a shelter if you’re ever forced to evacuate.

Extreme Heat

Contents of an emergency kit may have prevented one of the estimated 4,000 deaths that were caused by extreme heat. Most survival packs include water as part of the food rations. As well, you should find water purification tablets inside your emergency kit. These are ideal for turning dirty water from lakes, streams, and rivers into clean drinking water. Must-haves such as these help to prevent heat-related emergencies such as heat stroke or heat exhaustion, by keeping you hydrated and cool. Other tips to avoid heat stroke include, removing restrictive clothing and pouring water over your body and allowing it to evaporate off your skin. You can also use a fan to speed up the cooling process, as well, seek shelter under the shade of your tent or emergency tarp.

Snowstorms

Emergency kits that contain cold weather gear could have potentially saved one of the 3,600 people who have passed away from a snowstorm. The risk of blizzard conditions may cause car accidents as well as increase your chances of frostbite or hypothermia. An emergency kit has a bug out bag tent, survival blanket, warm pack, emergency sleeping bag, matches, and candles to keep you warm in winter. It can also contain specific items for your vehicle like a reflector, a tire inflator, a shovel, jumper cables and emergency tow rope. These items would become all the more critical if you’re trapped in a stranded car.

An emergency kit isn’t just a bunch of things; it’s your last line of defense against death caused by natural disasters.

12 Multi-Purpose Gear Items For Your Emergency Survival Kit

1. MULTI-TOOL WITH BELT SHEATH

This is one of the most important items in your kit. While accessories will vary, a good multi-tool may contain pliers, wire cutter, wire stripper, multiple blades, can / bottle openers, various screwdrivers, nut drivers, scissors, tweezers, ruler, awl, etc.

2. MACHETE

Although not very compact, a machete is lighter than most hatchets and serves more purposes. If you have a machete and a multi-tool in your kit, you will not need a hatchet or a knife. The only function lost with this elimination is the hammer on the back of most hatchets, but sticks or rocks will work just fine for most hammering needs in survival situations.

Blades are made of many different types of metals and alloys, in different tempers and thicknesses, widths, lengths, styles, and shapes. Handles are made of many different types of materials in many different shapes and sizes. A good survival machete will have a semi-flexible blade 18 inches or longer that is easy to sharpen, yet keep a good edge with moderate use. Most importantly, the handle MUST be comfortable and fit well in your hand. With a machete, you can perform any task that can be done with a large knife or hatchet. It can also be used to dig or pry, or as a formidable weapon. Install and use a wrist lanyard when chopping or swinging a machete.

3. PARACHUTE CORD

The most common type of parachute cord has a tensile strength of 550 pounds. That is far heavier than needed for most survival uses. The diameter of this cord is 4mm. That doesn't sound like much, but it adds up. Smaller diameter cord with a tensile strength of 200 – 250 pounds is quite sufficient and has half the bulk. Use to erect and build shelters and useful camp furnishings, repair clothing and gear, or as a sling for finding and carrying loads, bundles of firewood, boughs, reeds or grass for bedding, pull dead branches down from trees for firewood, boot lacing, belts, snares and traps, "burglar" alarms, binding splints, and secure bandages in place, fire starting material … the list goes on. Carry a minimum of 30 '.

4. DUCT TAPE

Get a good heavy-duty brand name roll. Use it to repair clothing, boots, tools, and equipment, construct shelters, furnishings, and implements. Use it to relieve hot friction spots on feet to prevent blisters, and wrap around hands as makeshift gloves. Twist into a "rope" if needed, which is good for making snowshoes. It also makes a good mousetrap and fire-starter.

5. DENTAL FLOSS

A 200 'spool of waxed dental floss can be invaluable. While important for maintaining good oral hygiene, it can serve other purposes such as repairing small items, sewing and stitching clothing, boots (or even skin), making tools and weapons, or used as fishing line.

6. SMALL DIAMETER WIRE

This can be galvanized, stainless steel or copper. The more flexible the better. Use it to repair gear items, make snares and traps, and at the fire pit to suspend a pot, meat, and other foods over the fire to cook. A grill or "toaster" can be made with wire.

7. PLASTIC SHEET

A black 6mil heavy-duty sheet 6'x8 'or larger. Use as a wind block, lean-to, shelter roof, rain-fly, ground tarp, blanket, or poncho, and to protect gear and clothing from rain, snow, and dew. Use to collect and store water, make a solar still. The black color absorbs sunlight creating heat which will help keep you warm and will generate more water quicker than clear plastic when used as a solar still, and it may be more visible to rescuers in certain terrains and conditions.

8. MYLAR SURVIVAL (SPACE) BLANKET

The reflective qualities of a space blanket are ideal for reflecting your body heat back to you, or campfire heat toward you or into your shelter. Used along with the plastic sheet there is are many combinations and configurations that can be incorporated to provide shelter and / or bedding. A space blanket is shiny like aluminum foil on at least one side, which is good for signaling rescuers under sunny conditions.

9. WAX CANDLES

Use for lighting, warmth, cooking, lighting fires, or signaling at night. Melted wax can be used for waterproofing leather boots, and thighs, knees, and seats of cotton pants. During "bug season" include a citronella candle to ward off insects. If out of water and your mouth is dry, chewing on a clump of wax will generate saliva, and it may help curb hunger pains. The act of chewing helps blood circulation in your head which may result in a more alert brain, which is good in a survival situation.

10. HEAVY-DUTY ZIPLOC BAGS

1 or 2 Gallon-size bags are ideal for packing clothing items, food, toiletries, and other gear items. Use to collect and store water. The gallon-size bags can be worn over socks to keep feet dry, or on your hat or head to keep your head dry. Sandwich bags work great for holding smaller items. Worn-out bags can be used to start fires.

11. HEAVY-DUTY PAPER TOWELS

Paper towels are good for not only the obvious everyday uses we find for them, but also serve other uses such as; note paper and wound dressing, filtering sediment from drinking water, and toilet paper.

12. FLAMMABLE FOOD

Fritos and Doritos snack chips are the best choices. While not the healthiest food available, it will still provide fuel for your body, and much-needed salt which helps prevent muscle cramping. Fritos and Doritos highly flammable. Use 2 or 3 as tender, or light the whole single-portion bag for a quick fire in wet conditions.

When assembling your kit, think of other uses an item might serve or other items that might serve its purpose. Consolidate to eliminate the need for several single-purpose items to reduce the weight and space requirements of your kit. Assemble your kit to suit your particular needs, but keep it simple and streamlined with multi-purpose survival gear items and face your next survival situation with confidence.

Survival Tips – The Best Emergency Food Kit

Who Needs The Best Emergency Food Kit?

Who knows what the future holds? If only we knew, day to day, what challenges would arise, we would never be caught unawares. Unfortunately, life just doesn't work that way. Those who prefer to look forward and make preparations for the "just in case" scenarios are often painted as fringe lunatics and doomsday preppers. However, assembling the best emergency food kit for yourself or your family should be something every responsible adult takes seriously. Just a few of the "normal" situations that could arise, when having emergency rations for your family would make sense, include: loss of a job, temporary lay off, extended storm damage or power outage that traps your family at home. Or perhaps you'd just like to be a position to help another family in need, should the opportunity arise. Then there are Armageddon type scenarios that plague the mind of some, and no better way to put those fears to rest than to look ahead and prepare for the worst. Whatever your reasons for looking forward and setting up emergency rations against a difficult time ahead, we are here to help you build the very best emergency food kit for your family.

Identifying Your Needs

First, lay out your preparation strategy. If you're just getting started in emergency preparation, you may not have more than a day or two worth of food in your cupboard. If that's the case, building up a thirty day supply of food is a good place to start. If you already have 30 days of emergency rations laid by, the next step may be building up a six month or year emergency food kit. The important thing is to start somewhere, and build your supplies up until you've assembled the best emergency food kit that you're able.

Who Are You Feeding?

Do you have children in the house? Teens? Older or elderly adults? Infants will require special feeding accommodations like milk or formula, while the elderly may have some unique nutritional needs, as well. Map out on paper who you're building a food supply for and any special things you need to prepare for them, or for yourself. Then consider what it takes to feed that person for a single day.

How Many?

Once you've written down what it takes to feed one person for one day, you'll need to multiply that by the number of people, and the number of days for which you're preparing.

What Do They Like To Eat?

There's no need to live for a month on nothing but rice and beans. You don't want to stock up on three months worth of food that your family won't touch with a six-foot pole, just because it was cheap. It may keep you alive in a pinch, but you want to enjoy it, if possible. So take the likes and dislikes into consideration as you plan. Don't forget to consider food allergies, as well. In an emergency situation, you wouldn't want to face an allergic reaction from cross contamination, so better to avoid problem foods altogether, if possible.

Types Of Emergency Rations

There are dozens of ways to build up a great emergency food kit. The easiest, though certainly not the least expensive, is to invest in commercially prepared emergency rations, offered by various companies. These kits come as single servings, or a month's worth of food for a single person. There are dozens of options to choose from.

Another method, requiring a little planning and management, is to simply take what you buy and use on a weekly basis, and start building up a supply that will last. If you ordinarily use three cans of beans and two boxes of mac 'n' cheese and a jar of peanut butter each week, then begin buying double that, and set the extra aside for your emergency food kit. Then manage your stock by rotating it so that your food stays as fresh as possible. Freshness would be a significant advantage in a long-term disaster, where you're relying on your emergency rations for months, or even years.

Once you've built up a few months supply of food, organize your cans and boxes with the soonest expiration date in the front and the furthest out in the back. Then, when you do your grocery shopping, put the new stuff in the back and use from the front. This keeps your stock fresh and ready to use if and when the need arises.

Home canning is another less expensive way to build up your emergency food kit. Canning is becoming a lost art, so if you're not familiar with how to do it, you're not alone. Canning food in glass jars requires a little learning and effort but can allow you to preserve tasty, homemade food for years. Be sure to learn which foods require pressure cooking versus water-bathing methods of preservation. Properly canned goods keep best in cool, dark places between 50 and 70 * F (10 – 21 * C) and are safe to eat for years after canning.

For bulk dry goods that are intended for long term storage, wheat, beans, rice, sugar and other dry goods can be vacuum sealed and stored in five gallon buckets with O2 absorbers to last for thirty years and more. For the truly prepared minded, a few buckets of wheat and corn will go a long way toward peace of mind.

A vacuum sealer is a good investment for anyone serious about their emergency rations. Sealing foods in smaller quantities not only preserves them longer but allows you to use them a little at a time, rather than having to use a large container up quickly once you've opened it.

If you're worried about the expiration date on store-bought canned goods, keep this story in mind. A steamboat named the Bertrand was trying to reach Montana in 1865 when it sunk to the bottom of the Missouri river. One hundred years later, canned goods from that wreck were recovered. In 1974, 109 years after the accident, the food was tested by chemists and found safe to eat. You should use good sense when eating canned foods that have passed their expiration dates. If it looks odd, smells bad or tastes bad, don't eat it!

Signs That The Food In Your Emergency Food Kit Has Gone Bad

Signs canned goods have gone bad: the can is bulging, or the lid has come unsealed. Check for mold or fermentation bubbles in the liquid. If the food rushes out of the can or jar when you open it, there is pressure on the contents that was not there when the can or jar was sealed. This is a good indication of bacterial activity causing a chemical reaction.

Comfort Foods

Once you've established a good base for emergency rations, you might want to start thinking about adding some comfort foods to your store. In stressful situations, we all turn to food for comfort, and yummy food might not be easy to come by in the event of a disaster. Some things to store include:

  • Chocolate – powdered cocoa keeps the best, but chocolate bars over 70% cocoa will keep for several months, and much longer if frozen. Hot chocolate mix has a shelf life of several years, and could easily be added to the rotation of your emergency food kit.
  • Mac n 'cheese – Best preserved dried by separating the noodles and cheese, and then vacuum sealing them with O2 absorbers. If you're worried about being able to cook macaroni and cheese, it can be canned, but it won't have the same texture as freshly made. Under cooking the noodles before canning will help it to be less mushy.
  • Honey – made with natural preservatives, honey will keep indefinitely, as long as water never gets near it. Store in very clean, very dry glass jars. If it crystallizes, you can return it to its liquid state with a little heat.
  • Freeze dried fruit or dehydrated fruit can be a great energy booster and will keep well when stored properly.
  • Hard candy – store with desiccants and vacuum sealing to provide a much needed pick me up under stressful conditions.
  • Coconut oil , especially virgin coconut oil will store for a very long time and provide added fat for comforting recipes when butter is not available.
  • Spices – if you get to a place where you're having to make all of your food from what you have on hand, you'll be very glad for some extra spices to … well … spice things up.
  • Alcohol – Obviously, a comforting item, but it serves many purposes in a disaster scenario and it keeps well. High alcohol content (over 20%) will keep the longest and over 40% can serve as a disinfectant if needed.
  • Tea – keeps well without special accommodations. To keep it the very freshest, store in small quantities with an O2 absorber.
  • Coffee – For those who really need their cuppa to keep their chin up, coffee will be an important part of the very best emergency food kit. Roasted coffee keeps, vacuum sealed in Mylar bags, for up to two years. If you rotate it through your emergency rations, you will have good coffee for some time. For preparation beyond that, you can store green coffee beans in Mylar bags with O2 absorbers, then roast and grind them as needed.

What To Choose?

How to decide what goes into the very best emergency food kit? A good rule of thumb is six months to a year of food that you would eat every day. This is easily managed through good shopping and rotation. For preparation beyond that time frame, vacuum sealed Mylar bags will keep dry goods for years. Many companies and even faith-based family preparation programs offer dry goods preserved in # 10 cans that will keep up to 30 years. Building an emergency food kit that can last several years in a pinch is possible, with planning and forethought.

Water will be critical to surviving certain types of disaster scenarios. When planning for emergency situations, one liter of water per person per day is a good starting point. You'll need some extra for sanitation and cooking, as well. Be sure you have plenty of water on hand, or a way to obtain water and sanitize it. Sanitation tablets and filtration systems would be a major component of the best emergency food kit.

Looking Ahead

For total preparedness, it's important to think ahead to food preparation during an emergency. If the power was out for three weeks, how would you cook that mac 'n' cheese you took such care to store? Even if you have a power generator for emergencies, stoves and microwaves pull too much energy to use the generator for cooking. A propane or butane camp stove with plenty of fuel cells, or a propane or charcoal grill are great options to have on hand. And don't forget to include a manual can opener in your emergency food kit.

Where To Keep It?

Storage space can be tricky, depending on your housing situation. If at all possible, you'll want to designate a neatly organized room that's specifically for food storage. You'll label your shelves, and keep things nicely stocked and rotated. If you don't live in this kind of fairy tale situation, you may have to get a little more creative about how you store your emergency food kit. A lot of food can be neatly stored, in cardboard boxes, under beds, in the bottoms or tops of closets, and under the stairs. You may need to reduce unnecessary clutter, to make room for emergency rations. The reward will be worth the effort.

Be Prepared, Not Scared

Taking the steps required to create the best emergency food kit that you possibly can will pay off in peace of mind. To know that you have the ability to care for those you love, and to be able to reach out to those around you in their time of need, will put you in a category reserved for just a few. You'll rest easy at night, knowing that whatever tomorrow holds, your family is provided for.