Kitchen Fire Safety

Kitchens are a natural place for fires to start: you are already working with open flames or very high heat. Take extra precautions to prevent fires.

Preventing kitchen fires

The number one cause of kitchen fires is unattended cooking. When cooking anything on top of the stove, or in the oven, stay with it. For long-cooking dishes, plan activities you can do in the kitchen, such as cleaning or preparing other dishes. If “kitchen activities” don’t come to mind, consider reading, writing, chatting with family or friends, or even reading a story to the kids. All of these can keep you happily and productively occupied while keeping an eye on what is being cooked.

If you cannot or don’t want to stay in the kitchen:

  1. Check frequently on food that is cooking,
  2. Have a working smoke alarm installed where it can warn of potential fire.
  3. Keep a fire extinguisher within easy reach.

Kitchens can be very active places, especially when meals are being prepared. These basic tips can increase your safety:

  1. Wear short-sleeve, close fitting clothing when cooking. Loose clothing can more easily catch fire.
  2. Watch children closely in the kitchen. Teach them fire safety and proper handling of tools to prevent burns, cuts, or other injuries. Do this before you teach them to cook. Stay with children for every step as they are learning ot cook. Reinforce and praise their safety skills.
  3. Grease can accumulate quickly in the kitchen. Grease fires can quickly spread to the entire kitchen. Clean your cooking surfaces and counters frequently to prevent food and grease build-up. Ideally this should be done immediately after cooking, or during clean-up after each meal.
  4. Keep flammable materials, such as curtains, towels, pot holders, plastic or paper bags, away form cooking surfaces.
  5. Store all solvents and flammable cleaners well away from all heat sources. Never keep gasoline or kerosene in the house, especially not in the kitchen.
  6. While cooking, make sure pan handles are turned away from the front of the stove so that no one will accidentally bump them. Boiling water or hot grease thrown from a jostled pan can cause severe burns. Keep the area in front of the stove clear and calm while cooking.

Putting out a fire

Even with the greatest care, you may someday have to put out a kitchen fire.

First, assess the danger. If the fire has spread beyond the oven or a pan, call the fire department right away. In most locations, you can call 911 and they will transfer you to the needed service.

If the fire is small and contained, as in food flaming in a pan, these tips may help:

  1. Slide a pan lid over a grease or oil fire to smother flames. Turn off the heat. Watch carefully to make sure the fire is not spreading somewhere unexpected. Leave the lid in place until it cools. Once the fire is completely out and everything is cool, thoroughly clean everything that was involved in the fire, especially the stove top or oven. If the flame got outside of a pan, you will need to decide whether there was any damage that must be repaired before you can cook again. Caution: Never attempt to carry a flaming pan outside. Doing this increases your risk of spreading the fire and of being burned.
  2. Keep a large box of baking soda on hand. Aside from its other uses, you can pour baking soda over most small food fires to extinguish the flames.
  3. Never use water or flour to put out fires. Water added to a grease fire reacts violently, sending hot grease everywhere. This spreads the fire and increases your chance of being burned. Flour can have a similar effect. Water poured on flames can also get into electrical circuits in the stove or oven, which can complicate the situation and increase the danger.
  4. If a fire occurs in your oven, keep the door shut and turn off the heat. This will usually smother the flames without further risk.
  5. Keep a fire extinguisher in the kitchen. There are several types of extinguishers, each designed for use with specific kinds of fire. Make sure you have the right kind; one that can put out grease-based fires most often found in kitchens. Make sure you know how to use the extinguisher. Check periodically to ensure that it is in proper working order.

Fire Extinguisher – The Do’s and Don’ts in Handling and Maintenance

We all have different ways to fight fire. Sometimes we prefer prevention rather than fighting it. Even though there are many ways to prevent this incidence from happening, fire accidents still occur. People still get hurt, loose their homes or even lives in the process. That is why people buy devices to ensure that small incidences of fire will not turn out big to the point of being destructive. Some people do survive with the aid of these devices

The presence of a fire-protecting device is important in making a place fire safety. Despite the fact that is mandated by building codes and standards to have them around, people still get them for the reason of fire safety. Even people owning their homes, buy them for the reason that even at home, fire can be a big risk to use. Your gas tanks or pipelines, grillers, burners, heaters and other electrical devices are all fire hazards. Although, these devices may not be used at all times, having them can be a plus in case of fire emergencies.

There are many types of devices that you can buy in the market and they also have different indications. Actually, these fire-protecting devices are commonly referred to as fire extinguishers. With these devices, there are certain things to keep in mind when using them. Take note of the dos and donts below:

DOs

1. read the instruction manual to understand the use of the device.

2. check the rating or classification of the device to know the kinds of fire it is applicable.

3. follow the pneumonic PASS in extinguishing the flames

4. Maintain a safe distance when extinguishing the flames.

5. put signs and indicators on the location of the device. Make sure that they can be seen easily. They should also be accessible.

6. Hang them on walls or use protective cabinets to keep them.

7. undergo proper training for proper handling of a fire extinguisher as set by the OSHA or Occupational Health and Safety Administration. Follow also strict rules set by the NFPA or standards and codes set by them for these devices.

8. recharge the equipment after use and follow maintenance schedule.

DONTs

1. use them if you have no idea on how to operate them. You will just put it into waste.

2. use water agents on grease and oil fires or use dry chemical extinguishers to electrical devices or anything with metal because it is corrosive.

3. aim at the flames of the fire.

4. stand too close to the fire or even plan to walk on those extinguished areas.

5. put them on areas where fire is most likely to happen making them unreachable.

6. leave them on corridors or any anything that is highly magnetic.

7. violate the standards because even with their presence you might still be at risk or more prone to the dangers of fire.

8. play with the device or even play with its substances use because of the possibility of injuring you.

5 Safety Tips on How to Deal With Fire

Many people died or get seriously injured because of fires every year. However, these can be prevented by having fire precautions and following some fire safety tips. Fire detection devices play very important roles to help prevent and control fires.

We should not take too lightly the importance of having fire precautions and fire detection system in your homes and buildings. Fire is powerful enough to cause us loss and devastation. The only way to protect our family is through proper prevention and early fire detection.

Below are the top five safety tips that you need to keep in mind in order to handle the wrath of fire effectively.

– Install a smoke detector and fire alarm. – They can detect unusual smoke earlier before you can possibly smell or feel the flames. They will warn you immediately so you can save your home and possessions, ask for help early, or escape in time. Change the smoke detector’s batteries at least once a year.

– Have fire extinguishers and fire blankets readily available. – They will help you put out small fires easily. Just make sure that your extinguishers are regularly checked and tested by the proper authority.

– Evacuate the place when needed. – If the fire is already too large to handle, you need to get out and escape. Use your escape route plans calmly.

– Learn how to manage smoke. – To prevent much smoke inhalation, leave the burning place slithering on your belling or crawling on your knees.

– Think of your life’s safety. – When you get trapped inside a room, close the door and stuff the spaces around the door to prevent smoke from entering. If there is a window, go there and ask for help. Do not ever think of jumping off the window and end up risking your life. In case you are already outside and wanted to save someone who is trapped or you want to save your things inside the burning house, do not even think of it. Let the trained personnel to handle those things. Just stay in a safe area and wait for the authority’s advice if it is already safe to reenter the building.

Fires can strike anytime and anywhere when least expected. Without fire detection device like fire alarm, even a small mistake could turn into a major disaster. Always prioritize your family’s safety. Every room should have at least one fire exit. If your room is on the second floor, install a ladder that you can drop from the window in case of fire emergency. Most importantly, you need to stay focus and do not panic so that you can think of the proper safety tips that will keep you safe in times of troubles like this.

Preventing fire from getting worse is not possible without early fire detection. Better invest in helpful and life saving things like this rather than lost all your possessions in a matter of minutes just because you underestimated the possible damages fire could bring.

Fire Starting Methods – Five Tips For Starting a Survival Fire

There are a lot of different ways to start a fire if you find yourself in a situation where you need one. What I’m talking about here is survival fires. You find yourself in a survival situation and you need a fire to keep yourself warm, dry out your clothes, or cook something tasty to eat.

Let me first say this. You know if you are not old enough to do this without adult supervision. So just don’t do it without adult supervision if you aren’t old enough to do it by yourself. You could get yourself into a lot of trouble and either hurt yourself or others or destroy a lot of property. Fire is a great tool if used properly but can be dangerous and destructive if you do not respect it.

The time to learn how to start a fire is not when you are in a survival situation. You need to practice this skill to get good at it.

Tip#1 for starting a survival fire – No matter what type of fire-starting method you use, you will need tinder and small twigs to begin with, so go ahead and gather it now. Tinder is any light weight combustible material that will easily light. Straws, dry grasses, and stringy type tree bark work well. Sometimes I take lint from my dryer and place it in a small Ziploc bag, then put it in my pants pocket when I plan to go to the woods. Dryer lint makes a great fire starter.

You should use wood that is finger sized in diameter for your starting wood. Be sure to go ahead and gather a few slightly larger pieces of wood also. After going through a lot of effort to start your fire, you don’t want to let it go out because you weren’t prepared.

Clear leaves and other debris from around your fire area to prevent the accidental spread of your fire into an area where you don’t want it. If this is a practice survival fire or a campfire, be sure to have plenty of water available to be used to put out the fire. This way if your fire begins to get out of hand, you can quickly put it out. Do not attempt to start a fire when the woods are extremely dry or on a windy day.

Tip#2 Always carry a good disposable cigarette lighter with you when you go to the woods. There is no need to try and be a hero. I usually have two or more cigarette lighters in my pocket when I go into the woods. They are light weight, don’t take up much room, and usually work great.

Tip#3 If you have a flashlight with you, use the batteries to start a fire. It will help if you have 00 steel wool. You can buy it at the hardware store. Steel wool is made of thousands of tiny metal fibers. These fibers are so small, that the electricity from a flashlight battery will quickly cause them to glow orange. Add some steel wool to your survival kit or pocket as a back-up. Practice this method in case for some reason your lighters don’t work.

Tip#4 You can purchase flint and steel from a number of sources. Practice striking the flint and steel together to send a spark into your tinder. This will take some practice. You never know when you may be in a situation where you have access to a piece of steel in a survival situation. You may be able to strike your steel against rock. Practicing will prepare you for this situation. I do not recommend using your knife for this purpose. Your knife is too valuable to you in a survival situation, and usually doesn’t make that good of a fire starter anyhow. Don’t damage your knife. If you absolutely have to try it, be sure to use the back of the knife blade and not the edge.

Tip#5 Try using a friction method. This is usually the first thing that comes to the mind of most people when they think of a survival fire. There are several friction methods. One of the most popular seems to be the fire bow. Basically for this method, you will use a shoe lace or other similar cordage to manufacture a tiny bow. You will also need a piece of wood for the drill and a fire board. I prefer to use scrub willow for my fire bow construction. This method looks easy, but it takes a lot of practice to get it right. It helps tremendously if you know someone who can teach you this method.

You will need to carve a notch in the edge of your fireboard. When you drill, material from your fireboard and drill will build up in the notch and form a coal. You will then need to transfer that hot coal to your tinder. A good way to do this is to have your tinder underneath the notch on your fireboard to begin with. You will carefully wrap the tinder around your hot coal and gently blow on it. This adds a lot of oxygen for fuel. As you continue to blow on your tinder, it will begin to smoke. Once it lights, you will want to place your tinder underneath some of your small twigs which should be set up in a small tee pee type formation. Of course, your twigs will now begin to catch on fire. As you manage your small fire, you will gradually add more and larger pieces of wood.

There are a multitude of methods you can use for starting a survival fire. Pick one and begin to study and practice it until you have mastered it. Then try another. You cannot be too prepared, and your friends will be impressed with your new skills and knowledge.